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"COVID-19 Lockdown Exit Analysis" 25th May 2020

News Highlights

India: Daily cases hit an all time high, as some Mumbai hospitals run out of beds

India is easing lockdown restrictions despite reporting 6,767 new coronavirus infections on Sunday, the country's biggest one-day increase, and government data is showing a doubling of the rate every 13 days or so. India has only 0.5 beds per 1,000 people, compared to China's 4.3 beds per 1,000 people, so Mumbai hospitals are running out of room for patients.

Infected hair stylists in Missouri expose client to the virus

As lockdown restrictions have eased around the world, barbers and salons have been in demand for long-suffering citizens in need of a trim. However, a pair of infected Missouri hairstylists may have exposed the virus to almost 150 people, who have been alerted and advised to self-isolate and look out for symptoms

Promising results from new coronavirus vaccine trial

Volunteers who received Moderna's Covid-19 vaccine had positive early results, including developing antibodies against the virus. Dr Tal Zaks, Moderna's Chief Medical Officer, said the vaccine could be available to the public as early as January, if future studies go well.

Lower key Eid celebrated around the world amidst coronavirus fears

Muslims the world over celebrated Eid with far less gusto than usual. Usually, Eid is a time of travel and family gatherings, but with several countries still under some for of lockdown, many of the world's 1.8bn Muslims will have to pray at home and avoid socialising. Saudi Arabia, home of the holy cities of Mecca and Medina, is still under complete lockdown.

Lockdown Exit
When will hairdressers reopen in Scotland? Date salons could open after Scottish government reveals new lockdown route map
The First Minister has unveiled plans to ease Scotland out of lockdown restrictions. She said that several strict measures will be relaxed from 28 May in a four-phase "route map". However, retail services including hairdressers are not expected to be allowed to open for bookings again until phase three of the plan. In England, Boris Johnson said that his blueprint for a gradual easing of the coronavirus lockdown in England could see primary schools, nurseries and shops partially reopening from 1 June.
Did Japan Just Beat the Virus Without Lockdowns or Mass Testing?
Japan’s state of emergency is set to end with new cases of the coronavirus dwindling to mere dozens. It got there despite largely ignoring the default playbook. No restrictions were placed on residents’ movements, and businesses from restaurants to hairdressers stayed open. No high-tech apps that tracked people’s movements were deployed. The country doesn’t have a center for disease control. And even as nations were exhorted to “test, test, test,” Japan has tested just 0.2% of its population -- one of the lowest rates among developed countries.
Total lockdown turns Karnataka into ghost state
A total lockdown on Sunday turned Karnataka into a ghost state, with an eerie silence and uneasy clam prevailing across its cities and towns. As decided by the state government to contain the coronavirus spread, the Sunday lockdown comes after a partial relaxation of restrictions on weekdays since May 19 to revive economic activity and restore near-normalcy
Majority of businesses in Dubai may not survive Covid-19 lockdown
70% of businesses in Dubai may not survive Covid-19 lockdown with advisers telling business owners to get out before it is too late. If strict lockdown measures continue in Dubai, according to a new survey conducted by the Dubai Chamber of Commerce, the city will be emptied of up to 70% of its businesses. Roughly half the companies surveyed said they would have to close if there is just one more month of lockdown.
Coronavirus: Churches, mosques and synagogues reopen across France
French churches were preparing to hold their first Sunday masses in more than two months after the government bowed to a ruling that they should be reopened -- provided proper precautions were taken. Nearly two weeks into the relaxation of its shutdown, the government finally allowed churches, mosques and synagogues to reopen. Last Monday, the France's Council of State, which instructs the government on legal issues, ordered it to lift its sweeping ban on all religious services, in place since the lockdown. The ruling said that such a ban on freedom of worship caused "damage that is serious and manifestly illegal", ordering the government to lift the ban within eight days. But priests, pastors, rabbis and imams will still have to ensure that the correct safety measures are in force.
Spain to reopen to tourists as South America named coronavirus hot spot
Spain said on Saturday it would let in foreign tourists and restart top league soccer in the coming weeks, accelerating Europe’s exit from strict coronavirus lockdowns, even as the disease continued its deadly surge in parts of South America. Brazil saw its death toll passing 22,000 on Saturday from more than 347,000 infections, the second biggest caseload of any country in the pandemic. And as much of the United States tiptoed out of lockdown at the start of Memorial Day weekend, which unofficially marks the beginning of summer, President Donald Trump sent a clear signal he was personally embracing normalization — he went golfing, his first such outing since March 8.
The Artisans Behind Italian Fashion Tremble at Their Future
“Nobody wants to spend money right now,” Ms. Grasso said. “Especially because we are expensive relative to rivals in countries like India. We will fight, of course, but it is going to be a struggle for businesses like ours to survive.”
How the Swiss have navigated crisis (mis)communication during Covid-19
The message was a perfect example of the clear, measured and earnest tone that the country’s authorities have tried to strike publicly from the start of the coronavirus outbreak. “It was received positively all over the country,” said Regula Hänggli Fricker, a professor of mass media and communication external link at the University of Fribourg. Clarity, consistency and transparency are all key ingredients of crisis communication, she added, “especially when trust is as important as [it is] in this pandemic”. Indications so far are that the government has gained effective control of communication during the pandemic. Public trust in government reached over 60%, according to a recent poll, and the decline in the number of new cases has allowed the country to pursue a gradual easing of confinement measures. Yet, at the start of the pandemic, it appeared as if the odds were stacked against the country and any response its leaders might muster. Switzerland, densely populated and sharing a border with Italy, one of the epicentres of the pandemic in Europe, quickly became one of the places most affected by the Covid-19 outbreak.
At a busy East African border, testing truckers created perfect conditions for coronavirus to spread
Truck drivers line up Wednesday in Namanga, a town that straddles the Kenya-Tanzania border. The porous border, inefficient testing and limited contact tracing have made Namanga an ideal place for the novel coronavirus to spread.
Coronavirus: Over 40 Covid-19 cases traced to church service in Germany
More than 40 churchgoers who attended a service after lockdown was eased in Germany earlier this month have contracted coronavirus, officials say. The service was held on 10 May at a Baptist church in Frankfurt. Church officials say they followed social distancing rules and disinfected the building ahead of the service. Each of Germany's 16 states determines its own lockdown exit plans. Hesse, where Frankfurt located, relaxed restrictions on worship on 1 May. Those attending services have to be kept 1.5m (5ft) apart, and provided with hand sanitiser.
Pandemic Swells in South America, as the U.S. Nears 100,000 Deaths
Since the initial outbreak of the coronavirus in China, the world has tracked a pandemic that rapidly spread west, proliferating across Asia and Europe, seeding hot spots across Africa and exploding in North America. Gaza reports its first coronavirus death. New York is allowing gatherings of up to 10.
Coronavirus in New Zealand: How Jacinda Ardern Sold a Drastic Lockdown
Leading New Zealand from isolation, Ms. Ardern coaxed her “team of five million” into accepting extreme restrictions. But the lessons of her success go beyond personality or charm.
Economic damage for India from lockdown to be significant: Moody's
Moody's Investors Service said on Friday that economic damage as a result of India's coronavirus lockdown will likely be extensive and reflect the country's inherent economic vulnerability and fiscal constraints.
Coronavirus: Travel restrictions, border shutdowns by country
Countries around the world are increasingly adopting sweeping measures, including full lockdowns, shutting down airports, imposing travel restrictions and completely sealing their borders, to contain the new coronavirus. Below is a list of countries that have taken such measures in recent days. Travellers should visit government websites for updated information and more details.
Trump urges quicker US reopening from virus lockdown - The Jakarta Post
On the eve of Memorial Day weekend -- the unofficial start to the American summer -- beaches are slowly welcoming sun worshippers. "We were just tired of waiting to get a normal life again, to get our freedom back. So we rented this big house by the beach," said Anne Miller, an Ohio resident visiting South Carolina. The same was true in Europe, where Cyprus bounded into its second stage of opening up, lifting curfews and allowing outdoor restaurants, barber shops and beaches to open. But the Mediterranean island's airports and hotels remain closed.
States and beaches reopen ahead of Memorial Day weekend
After weeks under stay-at-home orders, Americans should feel free to go outside and enjoy Memorial Day weekend as long as they practice social distancing and follow other guidelines, the nation's leading infectious disease expert said. "We'll be having people who want to get out there and get fresh air," Dr. Anthony Fauci said at a CNN coronavirus town hall. "You can do that. We're not telling people to just lock in unless you're in a situation where you have a major outbreak going on, we don't have too much of that right now in the country." But that does not mean throw caution to the wind. "Go out, wear a mask, stay six feet away from anyone so you have the physical distancing," he said Thursday night. "Go for a run. Go for a walk. Go fishing. As long as you're not in a crowd and you're not in a situation where you can physically transmit the virus."
Global report: India and Indonesia announce record daily infection figures
India has reported more than 6,000 new Covid-19 cases, its biggest one-day increase, while China has abandoned setting a GDP growth target because of the “great uncertainty” caused by the pandemic. The sharp increase in new infections in India came after the government began easing lockdown restrictions and as airlines prepared to reopen selected domestic routes. “This surge has happened after movement of people was partially allowed,” said Giridhar Babu, an epidemiologist at India’s public health foundation. “But if you see overall, this is a much lower trajectory as compared to the rest of the world.” Babu said India “seems to have the capacity” to contain the coronavirus, after authorities reported a total of more than 118,000 cases – up 5% from Thursday’s figure - including 3,583 deaths.
Downturn in economic activity starts to ease across the eurozone
The French PMI for services rose to 29.4 in May from 10.2 in April. The manufacturing PMI rose to 40.3 in May, from 31.5 in April. May’s flash PMI points to a faster recovery for Germany, reflecting a quicker lockdown exit and a lower reliance on hard-hit industries, such as tourism, than in other European large economies. “This, effectively, is evidence that the German economy is doing better than its peers,” said Claus Vistesen, chief eurozone economist at Pantheon Macroeconomics.
Exit Strategies
Lufthansa to resume flights to 20 destinations from mid-June
Lufthansa which is in talks with the German government over a 9 billion euro ($9.8 billion) bailout, will resume flights to 20 destinations from mid-June, including some holiday hot-spots, a spokeswoman said on Sunday. The destinations include Mallorca, Crete, Rhodes, Faro, Venice, Ibiza and Malaga, the spokeswoman said, adding flights would depart from the airline’s main hub in Frankfurt. Further destinations will be unveiled at the end of next week, she said.
Cuomo says New York State is 'decidedly in the reopening phase'
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Sunday that the state will take steps toward reopening this week even as the battle against the coronavirus continues. Though daily deaths in the state went above 100 again on Saturday, the overall numbers in the coronavirus battle are trending in the right direction, he said during a daily briefing held at Jones Beach. "We're decidedly in the reopening phase," he said.
Australia calls on younger people to get virus tests as reopening accelerates
New South Wales in Australia said it recorded just three new cases of the coronavirus yesterday and urged younger people to get tested as it prepares to further loosen restrictions on pubs and restaurants. NSW, which includes the city of Sydney, is home to nearly half Australia's roughly 7,100 coronavirus cases and plans to let pubs and restaurants host up to 50 seated patrons from 1 June, 40 more than currently allowed. That has prompted health officials to remind people to maintain social distancing measures and increase testing to prevent a "second wave" of infections. "As we move forward and as we try to relax the restrictions that we have lived under for the past two months, it is ... absolutely crucial that people come forward for testing if they have the slightest hint of any respiratory issues," NSW health minister Brad Hazzard said in a televised news conference."
The government can’t just follow the science – we need ethics to guide us out of lockdown
We need leadership that openly and transparently consults with ethicists to determine the best, most ethical, way for our country to navigate the pandemic. Ethics is the cartographer that can show us the right road to take. It can help us determine not what we can do, but what we should do. For example, we can collect personal data through track and trace technology, but what should we do with that data? How do we use it in such a way that it protects the public, while also preserving privacy, avoiding use of that data to discriminate or profit from those affected by the virus? We need to follow the ethics just as much as the government claims to be following the science in order to answer those questions.
Boris Johnson announces schools will reopen on 1 June as UK enters phase 2 of lockdown exit
The partial reopening of primary schools will go ahead as planned on 1 June as part of phase 2 of the lockdown exit strategy, Boris Johnson has announced. The announcement was made in the face of widespread opposition from unions and councils,
Spain to reopen to tourists as South America named virus hotspot
Spain said on Saturday it would let in foreign tourists and restart top league football in the coming weeks, accelerating Europe’s exit from strict coronavirus lockdowns, even as the disease continued its deadly surge in parts of South America. Brazil saw its death toll passing 22,000 on Saturday from more than 347,000 infections, the second biggest caseload of any country in a pandemic. And as much of the United States tiptoed out of lockdown at the start of the Memorial Day weekend which unofficially marks the beginning of summer, President Donald Trump sent a clear signal he was personally embracing normalization — he went golfing, his first such outing since March 8.
Boris Johnson announces schools will reopen on 1 June as UK enters phase two of lockdown exit
A major teaching union has warned that Boris Johnson's decision to press ahead with a partial reopening of primary schools in England on 1 June is "seriously at odds" with scientific evidence about the risk of coronavirus infection to pupils, teachers and parents sparking a second wave of Covid-19. And a second union said it would not be right for schools - which have been open only to vulnerable pupils and the children of key workers during lockdown - to open more widely at the start of next month.
Uhuru and Magufuli agree to resolve border stand-off caused by COVID-19
Kenya and Tanzanian governments have moved to resolve their border standoff that has paralysed transport for several days over a tedious COVID-19 testing procedure that locked out many drivers. The stand-off escalated this week when President Uhuru Kenyatta announced the closure of the Namanga border and all other routes to and from the country following increased cases of COVID-19 by drivers from the neighbouring country. By the time he announced the closure, more than 20 Tanzanian truck drivers had been turned away at the border after testing positive for the virus.
Spain Relaxes Lockdown As South America Named New Epicentre
Spain said on Saturday it would let in foreign tourists and restart top league football in the coming weeks, accelerating Europe's exit from strict virus lockdown, as South America was labelled "a new epicentre" by the World Health Organization. Brazil led the surge across South America, its death toll passing 21,000 on Friday from 330,000 infections, the third biggest caseload of any country in a pandemic that has infected 5.25 million globally and killed more than 338,000.
Study estimates 24 states still have uncontrolled coronavirus spread
The coronavirus may still be spreading at epidemic rates in 24 states, particularly in the South and Midwest, according to new research that highlights the risk of a second wave of infections in places that reopen too quickly or without sufficient precautions. Researchers at Imperial College London created a model that incorporates cellphone data showing that people sharply reduced their movements after stay-at-home orders were broadly imposed in March. With restrictions now easing and mobility increasing with the approach of Memorial Day and the unofficial start of summer, the researchers developed an estimate of viral spread as of May 17.
Spain will reopen to tourists in July
Spain will open its borders to international tourists from July, the prime minister has announced. In a televised speech setting out further details of his country’s lockdown exit plan, Pedro Sanchez said: ‘From now, foreign tourists can plan their holidays in our country.’ He added: ‘Spain needs tourism, and tourism needs safety in both origin and destination. We will guarantee that tourists will not run any risks and they will not bring us any risks. ‘There will be no opposing forces between health and business. Spanish tourism will now have two hallmarks: environmental sustainability and health safety.’
Over 40 Churchgoers Who Attended Service After Lockdown Have Contracted Coronavirus In Germany
More than 40 churchgoers who attended a service after lockdown was eased in Germany earlier this month have contracted coronavirus, officials say. The service was held on 10 May at a Baptist church in Frankfurt. Church officials say they followed social distancing rules and disinfected the building ahead of the service. Each of Germany's 16 states determines its own lockdown exit plans. Hesse, where Frankfurt located, relaxed restrictions on worship on 1 May.
All 50 U.S. states have taken steps toward reopening in time for Memorial Day weekend
The coronavirus’s U.S. death toll surpassed 90,000 on Tuesday, as states moved forward to reopen as Memorial Day weekend approaches. By Wednesday, all 50 states will have begun lifting restrictions put in place to combat the coronavirus outbreak. Many public health officials and politicians, however, continued to raise concerns that increased activity would put Americans at greater risk of a new surge of infections.
COVID-19 cases rise in Juarez and El Paso as Mexico readies for reopening of factories
The target date for reopening is June 1, although some officials say work may begin as early as Monday. The massive, multibillion-dollar international supply chain — which connects cities across Mexico and the U.S., including Dallas — stretches across El Paso and Juarez, one of the border regions hardest hit by COVID-19.
'Communicate In Clear Terms Lockdown Exit Strategy': Opposition Lists 11 Demands For Centre On Covid-19
Leaders of 22 opposition parties on Friday accused the Centre of “unabashedly” usurping powers of states and demanded restoration of Parliament functioning and oversight with immediate effect. The opposition parties also demanded immediate reversal of all 'unilateral policy decisions', especially on the changes in labour laws. The leaders, who attended a meeting of opposition parties convened by the Congress through video conferencing, discussed the current situation arising out of the COVID-19 pandemic and the lockdown induced by it. They put forth an 11-point charter of demands for the Centre at the virtual meeting.
Hitting the lockdown exit sweet spot
There’s a middle ground between a hard lockdown and a hard exit. Amid rising frustration and anxiety levels, policymakers are working on finding it
Partisan Exits
Trump urges quicker US reopening from virus lockdown
Trump, with an eye on his re-election prospects in November, made it clear he hoped more state governors would move toward a loosening of anti-virus restrictions. "We did the right thing but we now want to get going... you'll break the country if you don't," he told African-American leaders in Michigan, a key election battleground state. The Republican incumbent specifically talked about reopening places of worship -- something he had initially hoped would be done by Easter Sunday -- as important to the nation's healing. "People want to be in their churches," Trump said. "They're so important in terms of the psyche of our country." Trump has adopted the theme of "Transitioning Back to Greatness" as states reopen at different speeds.
‘Politicised nature’ of lockdown debate delays Imperial report
The publication of a long-awaited report from Imperial College London that models the impact of coming out of lockdown has been delayed for several weeks, following criticism of the team’s methods as the debate around the UK’s coronavirus restrictions has become increasingly politicised. Imperial’s MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis told the Financial Times at the end of April that a new report, which modelled the effects that easing various lockdown restrictions would have on future deaths from Covid-19, was due to be published some time the following week. However, the report has yet to be released, although its findings have been shared with government, according to two people associated with the Imperial team. The delay comes as the rightwing press and some Conservative politicians question the need for such stringent lockdown measures in the UK
Covid-19's deadly new surge is in rural America as states re-open
As the death toll nears 100,000, the disease caused by the virus has made a fundamental shift in who it touches and where it reaches in America, according to a Washington Post analysis of case data and interviews with public health professionals in several states. The pandemic that first struck in major metropolises is now increasingly finding its front line in the country’s rural areas; counties with acres of farmland, cramped meatpacking plants, out-of-the-way prisons and few hospital beds.
Debate over reopening US plays out online and in the streets
When his business was hit by a coronavirus lockdown, Josh Ellis saw a threat to his livelihood and a breach of the US Constitution. So he went on Facebook and called for protests. The appeal "went viral instantly," said the 40-year-old, who set up a Facebook page called American Revolution 2.0 in early April. The organization is now a driving force behind demonstrations against stay-at-home orders and compulsory closures of non-essential businesses -- and online planning is a central part of the campaign. Ellis -- who is coordinating with various "reopen" groups, as well as militias and gun and religious rights advocates -- is in the middle of an issue dividing the United States: how can the economy reopen, and when can people return to work?
Continued Lockdown
Muslims celebrate Eid al-Fitr holiday amid curfews, coronavirus fears
Muslims around the world on Sunday began celebrating Eid al-Fitr, a normally festive holiday marking the end of the fasting month of Ramadan, with millions under strict stay-at-home orders and many fearing renewed coronavirus outbreaks. The three-day holiday is usually a time of travel, family get-togethers and lavish daytime feasts after weeks of dawn-to-dusk fasting. But this year many of the world's 1.8 billion Muslims will have to pray at home and make due with video calls. Some countries, including Turkey, Iraq and Jordan, have imposed round-the-clock holiday curfews. But even where many restrictions have been lifted, celebrations will be subdued because of fears of the pandemic and its economic fallout. Saudi Arabia, home to the holy cities of Mecca and Medina, is under a complete lockdown, with residents only permitted to leave their homes to purchase food and medicine.
Bolsonaro calls coronavirus a 'little flu.' Inside Brazil's hospitals, doctors know the horrifying reality
In Brazil's largest and most badly infected city, coronavirus has yet to peak, yet already the healthcare system is crumbling visibly around us. As doctors struggle valiantly to save lives, the country's President, Jair Bolsonaro, seems more focused on another sick patient: his country's economy. Brazil this week became the country with the second most infections worldwide after the United States, with more than 330,000 confirmed cases. But Bolsonaro, who once dismissed Covid-19 as a "little flu," has urged businesses to reopen, despite many governors stressing social isolation measures to slow the spread. In the huge intensive care unit (ICU) of Emilio Ribas Infectious Disease Institute in São Paulo, anger swirls among doctors when asked about their President's comments. "Revolting," says one. "Irrelevant" declares another.
Doctors Without Borders go from wars to fighting Covid-19 in Brazil's poorest areas
Previously Doctors Without Borders have been accustomed to acting in disasters, now the NGO finds itself offering assistance to homeless people fighting Covid-19 in Sao Paolo
Nigeria to impose precision lockdown in coronavirus hotspots
Nigeria announced on Monday it would impose precisely targeted lockdown measures in areas that report rapid increases in cases of the coronavirus, while the phased reopening of the economy as a whole would go ahead more slowly than planned. The government extended a full lockdown in Kano state, the northern economic hub where authorities are investigating a spate of mysterious deaths. Kano has the second highest number of confirmed cases in the country after Lagos. The government said its phased reopening of strict lockdowns in Lagos, Abuja and Ogun states would go more slowly than initially planned, and the current phase of gradual reopening would last a further two weeks.
Scientific Viewpoint
Global partner to help manufacture one billion doses of Moderna’s mRNA coronavirus vaccine
Scaling up millions of doses of a coronavirus vaccine is a huge step in knocking down the pandemic, and a 10-year strategic plan between Cambridge biotech company Moderna and Swiss company Lonza aims to accomplish that goal. Moderna’s mRNA coronavirus vaccine has shown promise in early studies, and the company announced in early May it will partner with Lonza to enable manufacturing of up to one billion doses per year of the vaccine. The first batches of the messenger ribonucleic acid vaccine, called mRNA-1273, are set to be manufactured at Lonza’s United States suites in June, according to Moderna. Over time, more production sites at Lonza’s many worldwide facilities will be established to make up to a billion doses a year.
Pa. doles out 3rd round of remdesivir, which might help coronavirus recovery; these hospitals received it
The Pennsylvania Department of Health has distributed the third shipment of the investigational antiviral medication remdesivir to treat patients in the hospital with COVID-19. The medication was sent to the department by the federal government on Thursday and 8,928 doses of medication were shipped to 81 hospitals on Friday. “The department is working to give our hospitals every opportunity to treat patients with COVID-19,” Secretary of Health Rachel Levine said. “It is important to note that there is limited information on the safety and effectiveness of using remdesivir to treat people in the hospital with COVID-19. However, it was shown in a clinical trial to shorten the recovery time in some people, which is why the Food and Drug Administration has authorized the emergency use of the medication for treatment.”
Early results from Moderna coronavirus vaccine trial show participants developed antibodies against the virus
Volunteers who received Moderna's Covid-19 vaccine had positive early results, according to the biotech company, which partnered with the National Institutes of Health to develop the vaccine. If future studies go well, the company's vaccine could be available to the public as early as January, Dr. Tal Zaks, Moderna's chief medical officer, told CNN. "This is absolutely good news and news that we think many have been waiting for for quite some time," Zaks said.
CDC publishes new pandemic guidance for religious worship
Religious institutions should provide soap and hand sanitizer, encourage the use of cloth masks and clean their facilities daily if they want to open while coronavirus is still spreading, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said in newly released guidance Friday. Churches, synagogues, mosques and other institutions should also promote social distancing and consider limiting the sharing of objects such as books and hymnals, the CDC said. The new guidance comes at the urging of the White House, which has been in a tug-of-war with the CDC over pandemic guidance.
Coronavirus Resurgence
A hairstylist worked while symptomatic and exposed 91 people to coronavirus
A hairstylist with coronavirus worked for eight days this month while symptomatic, exposing as many as 91 customers and coworkers in Missouri, health officials said. The case highlights the threats of community spread in the United States as businesses reopen after weeks of restrictions to combat the spread of coronavirus.
Second Infected Missouri Hairstylist May Have Exposed 56 Clients to Coronavirus: Officials
A second Missouri hairstylist who showed up for work at a salon earlier this month while exhibiting coronavirus symptoms may have exposed as many as 56 clients, health officials said. On Saturday, officials said that another symptomatic hairstylist at the Great Clips salon in Springfield may have exposed up to 84 customers and seven coworkers while working for eight days between May 12 and May 20. The Springfield-Greene County Health Department said that both hairstylists and their clients were wearing face coverings. “It is the hope of the department that because face coverings were worn throughout this exposure timeline, no additional cases will result,” the department said. Officials said they are tracking down everyone who was potentially exposed and advising them to watch for symptoms.
More patients than beds in Mumbai as India faces surge in virus cases
India on Sunday reported 6,767 new coronavirus infections, the country’s biggest one-day increase. Government data shows the number of coronavirus cases in the world’s second-most populous country are doubling every 13 days or so, even as the government begins easing lockdown restrictions. India has reported more than 131,000 infections, including 3,867 deaths. “The increasing trend has not gone down,” said Bhramar Mukherjee, a professor of biostatistics and epidemiology at the University of Michigan, referring to India’s cases. “We’ve not seen a flattening of the curve.”
New Lockdown
Total lockdown turns Karnataka into ghost state
A total lockdown on Sunday turned Karnataka into a ghost state, with an eerie silence and uneasy clam prevailing across its cities and towns. As decided by the state government to contain the coronavirus spread, the Sunday lockdown comes after a partial relaxation of restrictions on weekdays since May 19 to revive economic activity and restore near-normalcy